Fiance Visa UK Financial Requirements in 2021

FREE UK Partner Visa Video Series

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In this free video series, we discuss:

  • The financial requirement
  • The online application form
  • Document translations
  • The adequate accommodation requirement
  • The English language requirement
  • Dependent children requirement
  • The unmarried partner visa requirement
  • Other partner visa requirements

As specified by Paragraph A1 of Appendix FM-SE, the fiance visa UK financial requirements in 2021 are that: 

  • You must demonstrate that you have the required level of income that applies to your application;
  • You must show that your income is from permitted sources;
  • The income that you include must cover specified time periods; and
  • You must evidence each source of income according to specific requirements.

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We will look at these in 6 easy-to-understand steps.

What is the required level of income that you need to earn?

What sources of income can you include to meet the financial requirement?

What category does your income fall under?

How is your income calculated?

Can you combine your different sources of incomes?

What financial documents are required?

step 1

The required level of income (a.k.a. “the financial requirement”)

For most applications, the required level of income is £18,600.

There are, however, three factors that can change this £18,600 figure this.

#1 Are there are dependent children who are also applying?

First of all, if your children:

  • Are British Citizens;
  • Are European nationals;
  • Already settled in the UK; or
  • Qualify under Appendix 8 of Appendix Armed Forces

…then this will not affect the required level of income.

financial requirement children 2019Rather, the financial requirement will only be higher if:

  • Your child needs a visa to stay in the UK and is applying as a dependent at the same time as you; or
  • Your child needs a visa to stay in the UK and is applying as a dependent before you reach settlement; or
  • Your fiancé(e) in the UK (‘sponsor’) is already sponsoring a child.

We provide examples of when a child will increase the minimum income threshold in video 3 of our free video series.

The financial requirement will be an additional £3,800 for the first child and an additional £2,400 for each further child.

In summary:

  • If no children are applying with you, the financial requirement is £18,600.
  • If you have one child who is applying with you, the financial requirement will be £22,400.
  • If you have two children who are applying with you, the financial requirement will be £24,800.
  • If you have three children who are applying with you, the financial requirement will be £27,200.
  • If you have four children who are applying with you, the financial requirement will be £29,600.
  • If you have five children who are applying with you, the financial requirement will be £32,000.

#2 Do you and/or your fiancé(e) have cash savings?

Firstly, it should be noted that the Immigration Rules states that cash savings must be held in ‘cash’ (i.e. not equity or investments). We discuss this, as well as the exceptions to this rule, in video 3 of our 3-part video series.

If your fiancé(e) and/or you have cash savings of more than £62,500, then this alone can meet the financial requirement (depending on whether there are dependant children applying or not).

If your fiancé(e) and/or you have cash savings of at least £16,000 but less than £62,500, then this can be used to reduce the financial requirement that applies to your application.

For more information about the cash savings requirement, read our article “Cash Savings Guidance for 16000 – 62500+ Spouse & UK Partner visas in 2021“.


#3 Does the UK partner receive a permitted benefit?

As we mention in video 1 of our 3-part video series, if the UK partner receives a permitted benefit, instead of meeting the financial requirement, your application must meet the adequate maintenance test.

For a step-by-step guide on this, feel free to read our article “Adequate Maintenance Guidance for UK visas [2021 REQUIREMENTS]“.

The permitted benefits are:

  • Armed Forces Independence Payment or Guaranteed Income Payment under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme;
  • Attendance Allowance;
  • Carer’s Allowance;
  • Constant Attendance Allowance;
  • Disability Living Allowance (DLA);
  • Industrial Injury Disablement Benefit;
  • Personal Independence Payment (PIP);
  • Mobility Supplement or War Disablement Pension under the War Pensions Scheme; and
  • Severe Disablement Allowance

step 2

What permitted sources of income can you include in order to meet the financial requirement?

There are 7 permitted sources of income:

Employment income

Self-employment income

Dividend income

Cash savings

Property rental

Pension income

Income that falls under ‘other sources of income’

employment income

Earnings from employment income can count towards meeting the financial requirement.

However, as your fiancé(e) visa application must be submitted from outside of the UK, it is generally only the UK partner’s employment earnings that can be taken into account.

Example

Sally (the ‘applicant’) is applying for a fiancé(e) visa from outside of the UK.

Despite the fact that she earns an equivalent of £71,000 per year as a doctor in Pakistan, she cannot include this to meet the financial requirement.


self employment incomeEarnings from the sponsor’s self employment income can count towards the financial requirement.

Please note that self employment income only refers to income earned by individuals who are self employed as:

  • A sole trader
  • A partner
  • Or in a franchise

Individuals who earn an income from a UK limited company they own will be considered as employees and/or directors of a specified limited company and not self-employed.

Not only is the supporting evidence required by the Immigration Rules completely different, but the calculation of the income that can be included towards the financial requirement also differs.

For a step-by-step account of how you can find out if the income is from a specified limited company or not, check out our article “Specified Limited Company Guidance [Sole Directors, Owners and Employees]“, as well as video 2 of our free video series where we discuss this in detail.


dividend incomeThe sponsor’s dividend income can be included towards the fiance visa UK financial requirement (whether or not that dividend income is from a ‘specified limited company‘ or not).

One often overlooked fact is that, if the applicant receives dividend income from a company that is not a ‘specified limited company’, then this income can also be included towards the fiance visa uk financial requirement.

 Please note that the supporting evidence required by the Immigration Rules will differ if the dividend income derives from a specified limited company’ or a ‘non-specified limited company’.

The calculation of income that can be included from dividend income will also depend on whether the income is from a ‘specified limited company’ or not.


cash savingsCash savings can be included towards the financial requirement.

Despite what is commonly stated on the internet, both the applicant and sponsor can include cash savings towards the financial requirement for a UK fiance visa.

£62,500 is the amount generally required to meet the financial requirement solely from cash savings.

Please remember though, if you are applying with dependent children, this figure may be higher.

If either your fiancé(e) and/or you have cash savings of more than £16,000 but less than £62,500, then these may be used to reduce the financial requirement.

More information about the cash savings requirement can be found here.


Pension income can also be included towards the financial requirement.

Pension income can take the form of:

  • State pensions (either from the UK or from abroad);
  • Occupational pensions; and
  • Private pensions.

Again, both the applicant and sponsor’s pension income can be included towards the UK fiance visa financial requirement.


pension incomeIncome received from property rental can count towards meeting the financial requirement on the conditions that:

  • The property must be owned by you, your fiancé(e) or is in both of your names jointly
  • The property must not be your main residence and must not be the residence that you intend to live in once the visa is granted.

other sourcesOther sources of income can count towards meeting the financial requirement and these include:

  • Dividends or other income from investments, bonds, trust funds or stocks and shares (from a non-specified limited company);
  • A maintenance grant or stipend (that is not a loan) which is given because of undergraduate or postgraduate research or study;
  • Widowed Parent’s Allowance, Bereavement Payment, Bereavement Allowance & UK Maternity Allowance;
  • Interest from savings
  • Payments under the War Pensions Scheme, the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme and the Armed Forces Attributable Benefits Scheme.
  • On-going royalty payments.
  • On-going payments from a structured legal settlement.
  • On-going insurance payments.

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step 3What category does your income fall under?

The majority of this article relates to the majority of applications that do not receive a permitted benefit (e.g. Disability Living Allowance or Carer’s allowance).

A separate post that discusses the adequate maintenance requirement can be found here.

Now that we have discussed the 7 sources of income are permitted to meet the financial requirement, let us now look in turn at how to determine what category these sources fall under.

Why is it important to know what category our income falls under?

It is extremely important to correctly determine the correct category.

This is because the Home Office uses different rules and different time periods in order to calculate gross annual income under each category.

In addition to this, the supporting evidence you must provide will differ between one category and another.

Unfortunately, if you do not provide all of the specified documents required, your application is likely to be refused.


What sources income of income do you want to include towards the UK fiancé(e) visa financial requirement?

Employment income

Self-employment income

Dividend income

Cash savings

Pension income

Other income from investments, stocks and shares, bonds or trust funds

A permitted benefit

employment incomeThe first thing that you need to find out is whether the sponsor’s employment income is from a specified limited company or not.

The definition of a specified limited company is found in paragraph 9(a) of Appendix FM-SE and states that a specified limited company is one in which:

(i) the person is either a director or employee of the company, or both, or of another company within the same group; and

(ii) shares are held (directly or indirectly) by the person, their partner or the following family members of the person or their partner: parent, grandparent, child, stepchild, grandchild, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew, niece or first cousin; and

(iii) any remaining shares are held (directly or indirectly) by fewer than five other persons.

Again, we discuss each of these elements, as well as additional circumstances where the Home Office caseworker may wrongly treat the employer to be a specified limited company in video 2 of our free video series.


If the company is a ‘non-specified limited company’…

The relevant categories will there be Category A and Category B.

What is the difference between Category A and Category B?

Category A is generally for sponsors who have been employed with their current employer for longer than 6 months at the time the fiance visa UK fee is paid.

Category B, on the other hand, is generally for sponsors who:

i) have been employed with their current employer for fewer than 6 months at the time the fiance visa UK fee is paid;

OR

ii) Have been employed with their current employer for longer than 6 months at the time the fiance visa UK fee is paid BUT do not meet the financial requirement due to the way that Category A is calculated.

Therefore, it can be seen that individuals who have been employed for longer than 6 months can choose to rely on either Category A or Category B.

Individuals who have been employed for fewer than 6 months, on the other hand, can only apply under Category B.


If the company is a ‘Specified limited company’…

If:

i) the sponsor is a director or employee of the UK limited company that provides the sponsor with an income (via employment income and/or shares); and

ii) Shares are held directly or indirectly by the applicant, sponsor, or the applicant and sponsor’s family members; and

iii) any remaining shares are held by fewer than 5 people

… then the sponsor must include this income under Category F or Category G.

What is the difference between Category F and Category G?

Under Category F, the gross annual income from employment and/or dividends will be based on the last full financial year (as stated in the most recent CT600 company document*).

Under Category G, the gross annual income from employment and/or dividends will be based on the average of the last two full financial years (as stated in the two most recent CT600 company documents).

*The CT600 document is an accounting document that relates to the employing business – ask the business’ accountant or employer for this.

Knowing the difference between Category A, B, F and G is important. 

For more information on this, check out our article “Category A or B, F or G? [UK Visa Financial Requirements Guide]“.


self employment incomeRemember, self employment income only refers to income earned by individuals who are self employed as:

  • a sole trader;
  • a partnership; and
  • in a franchise.

Self-employment income is considered under Category F or Category G.


dividend incomeIf dividend income is from a specified limited company, this is to be included under Category F or Category G.

If dividend income is not from a specified limited company, this is included under Category C.


cash savingsCash savings are included under Category D.


Pension income is included under Category E.


pension incomeProperty rental income is included under Category C.


other sourcesOther sources of income are included under Category C.  These are:

  • Dividend income (only if this is not from a ‘specified limited company’) or other income from investments, stocks and shares, bonds or trust funds .
  • Interest from savings.
  • Maintenance payments from a former partner of the applicant in relation to the applicant or any children of the applicant and their former partner. Also, maintenance payments from a former partner of the applicant’s partner in relation to that partner.
  • UK Maternity Allowance, Bereavement Allowance, Bereavement Payment and Widowed Parent’s Allowance.
  • Payments under the War Pensions Scheme, the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme and the Armed Forces Attributable Benefits Scheme.
  • A maintenance grant or stipend (not a loan) associated with undergraduate study or postgraduate study or research.
  • Ongoing insurance payments.
  • Ongoing payments from a structured legal settlement.
  • Ongoing royalty payments.

permitted benefitsCategories A to G do not apply if the sponsor receives one of the following ‘permitted benefits’:

  • Armed Forces Independence Payment or Guaranteed Income Payment under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme;
  • Attendance Allowance;
  • Carer’s Allowance;
  • Constant Attendance Allowance;
  • Disability Living Allowance (DLA);
  • Industrial Injury Disablement Benefit;
  • Personal Independence Payment (PIP);
  • Mobility Supplement or War Disablement Pension under the War Pensions Scheme; or
  • Severe Disablement Allowance.

Instead, the ‘adequate maintenance test‘ applies.


step 4How is the gross annual income calculated under each of the Categories?

Once you have correctly worked out which category your source of income falls under, the next step is to see exactly how to calculate gross annual income.

To do this, you have to apply a formula specific to the category under which you are applying.

Which category are you applying under?
Category A
Category B
Category C
Category D
Category E
Category F
Category G

Category AEmployment income from a non-specified limited company

So, assuming that you are confident that:

i) the employing company is a non-specified limited company; and

ii) By the time the online application is submitted, the sponsor will have been employed for longer than 6 months when the application is submitted…

… you then must follow the following two steps in order to calculate the gross annual income from Category A.

Step 1: Is the employment income salaried or non-salaried?

Salaried employment are typically jobs that have a contracted minimum number of working hours and are paid a minimum rate that is fixed (usually annually)

Non-salaried employment are typically jobs that pay according to the amount of work undertaken and the hours may vary from week-to-week.

“Why is it important to differentiate between salaried and non-salaried employment?”

It is important because the Home Office calculates the annual income from salaried employment and non-salaried employment completely differently.

Step 2: Calculate the gross annual income using the below formula

For salaried employment

To do this, you multiply the lowest salary payment received (gross) in the 6 months prior to the date of application by 12 (if salary is received monthly) or 52 (if salary is received weekly)

Example

Salary received on January 1st: £2000 (gross)
Salary received on February 1st: £2000 (gross)
Salary received on March 1st: £1500 (gross)
Salary received on April 1st: £2000 (gross)
Salary received on May 1st: £2000 (gross)
Salary received on June 1st: £2000 (gross)

The lowest salaried payment received (£1,500) multiplied by 12 (since the salary is received monthly = £18,000 gross annual income.

For non-salaried employment

To do this, add up the gross income received from employment in the 6 months before you submit the application, then divide this figure by 6 and multiply this number by 12.

Example

Maria has been in non-salaried employment for 8 months.

The following are previous 6 months’ gross figures (as seen on her pay slips and bank statements):

February: £1,700
March: £1,800
April: £1,500
May: £1,600
June: £2,400
July: £1,800
Total: £10,800

£10,800 divided by 6 =£1,800

£1,800 multiplied by 12=£21,600.

Maria’s gross annual income from non-salaried employment is therefore £21,600.


Category BEmployment income from a non-specified limited company

So, assuming that you are confident that the employing company is a non-specified limited company,  you then must follow the following two steps in order to calculate the gross annual income from Category A. 

Step 1: Salaried or non-salaried employment?

The first step is to determine whether the employment income is salaried or non-salaried employment.

Salaried employment are typically jobs that have a contracted minimum number of working hours and are paid a minimum rate that is fixed (usually annually).

Non-salaried employment are typically jobs that pay according to the amount of work undertaken and the hours may vary from week-to-week.


Step 2: Category B calculation 

Once you know whether the employment is deemed to be salaried or non-salaried, the next step will be to look at how the gross annual income from employment is calculated under Category B.

Category B has two tests.

We will call these two tests ‘part 1‘ and ‘part 2‘.

Both of these tests must be passed in order to meet the financial requirement under Category B alone.


For salaried employment

Part 1 of the Category B test

The gross annual salary at the date of application (which is when you pay the Home office fees on the online application) must be higher than the financial requirement that applies (usually £18,600).

This will be shown on the most recently dated pay slip.

If the gross annual salary is not stated on the pay slip, then you should also include a signed contract of employment in your application which states gross annual salary.

You can calculate the gross annual salary using this formula:

  • Multiply the amount of gross salary, as stated on the pay slip, by 12 (if salary is received on a monthly basis)
  • Multiply the amount of gross salary, as stated on the pay slip by 52 (if salary is received on a weekly basis)

Example

Mark receives his salary every month.

The last salary that he received (as evidenced by his monthly payslip) before he submitted the application was £3,215 (gross).

£3,215 x12 = £38,580.

Mark’s gross annual income at the date of application is therefore £38,580 (gross).

Part 2 of the Category B test

The gross annual salary received from employment in the 12 months prior to the application being submitted must also exceed the financial requirement that applies to your application (usually £18 600).

Example of salaried income under Category B

Peter’s pay slips in the past 12 months were as follows:

December 2018: £800
January 2019: £1,100
February 2019: £1,200
March 2019: £900
April 2019: £1,100
May 2019: £900
June 2019: £900
July 2019: £1,300
August 2019: £1,600
September 2019: £1,300
October 2019: £3,100
November 2019: £1,700
Total=£15,900.

Since Peter received £15,900 from employment in the 12 months prior to submitting the online application, he does not meet part 2 of the Category B test.

Since he is not applying with any child dependants, the requirement here would be that he must have received more than £18,600 in employment income prior to the online application being submitted.


For non-salaried employment

Part 1 of the Category B test

The ‘annualised average‘ for non-salaried employment must be higher than the financial requirement that applies (normally £18,600).

In order to calculate the ‘annualised average’ for non-salaried employment, follow the below steps:

Step 1

Total the gross income (i.e.earnings before tax) throughout the whole period that your fiancé(e) has been employed with the current employer(s) (up to a maximum of 12 months).


Step 2

  • If payment is received on a monthly basis, divide the total by the number of months employed by the current employer (up to a maximum of 12 months)
  • If payment is received on a weekly basis, divide the total by the number of weeks employed by the current employer (up to a maximum of 12 months)
  • If payment is received on a daily basis, divide the total by the number of days employed by the current employer (up to a maximum of 12 months)

Step 3

  • If payments are received on a monthly basis, multiply this number by 12
  • If payments are received on a weekly basis,  multiply this number by 52
  • If payments are received on a daily basis,  multiply this number by 365

The figure that you reach after following these three steps will be the annualised average.

This must be higher than the financial threshold that applies (£18,600, or higher if there are dependent children applying – see step 1 of this article.

Example of non-salaried income under Category B

Beatrice has been employed for 5 months.

She receives monthly pay slips.

In her 5 months of employment, she received a total of £15,500.

The following were her monthly pay slips:

Month 1 – £1,500 (gross)
Month 2 – £4,500 (gross)
Month 3 – £3,500 (gross)
Month 4 – £1,500 (gross)
Month 5 – £4,500 (gross)

£15,500 divided by the 6 (the number of months she has been employed) = £3,100

£3,100 multiplied by 12 = £37,200 gross annualised average income from non-salaried employment.

Part 2 of the Category B test

The gross annual salary received in the 12 months prior to the application being submitted must also exceed the financial requirement that applies (usually £18 600).

Please remember – for income under Category B, you must pass both part 1 and part 2 of the test.


Category CNon-employment income

As a general rule, the amount that you can include towards the financial requirement is the amount received in the 12 months prior to the date of application.

This general rule can vary, depending if more than one source of income is depended on in the application.

Please also note that there may be additional documentation required, or calculations of income may vary, depending on what non-income source(s) you are depending upon.


Category DCash savings

Cash savings are discussed in this spouse visa cash savings article – the rules including cash savings for a UK spouse visa and a UK fiancé(e) visa are similar.


Category EPension income

Normally, you can include the current gross annual income from the pension that is currently being received by your fiancé(e) or you when you pay the Home Office visa fees on the online application –  as long as the pension became a source of income at least 28 days before the date of the application.

Example

Sarah has been a senior civil servant for 35 years.

On 1st March 2021, Sarah will start to receive her pension,  which will provide her with a gross annual income of £37,850.

Therefore, she will be able to use this pension income to satisfy the financial requirement if the application is submitted 28 days after the 1st March 2021.

The amount of pension income that Sarah can use towards the financial requirement will be £37,850.


Category FEmployment and/or dividend income from a specified limited company

The gross annual income from employment and/or dividend income from a specified limited company is the gross total of the employment and/or dividend income received in the period stated by the most recent CT600 (which is the ‘last full financial year’).

For those who are directors or employees of specified limited companies, the last full financial year is specified in the company tax return (CT600 document).

Unlike the self-assessment period for self-employed persons, the companies tax period is something that varies depending on the particular company.

The relevant tax year will be the one that has most recently passed.

Because the most recent full financial year will be the one that has just passed, please be mindful that your fiancé(e) may have to file the company’s taxes earlier than normal.

Example

Matt wants to include employment income under Category F from his specified limited company that he solely owns.

Matt wants to submit his fiancé(e)’s visa application on 1st April 2021.

Matt’s limited company’s company tax year is 3rd March – 2nd March.

The relevant financial year for Matt would therefore be 3rd March 2020 – 2nd March 2021.


Self-employed income as a sole trader, in a partnership or franchise

If you are self-employed (as a sole trader, as a partnership or as a franchise), you should ensure that the accounts for the most recent financial year have been completed.

The gross annual income from self-employment that you can include towards the financial requirement will be the gross taxable profits from the sponsor’s share of the business during the ‘last full financial year’ i.e: the self-assessment tax period that has most recently ended.

In the UK, the standard self-assessment tax return period is 6 April of one year to 5 April of the next year.

Example

Hannah is self-employed as a sole trader.

Hannah wants to submit a fiancé(e) visa application on 1st January 2021.

In this case, the most recent full financial year will be 6 April 2019- 5 April 2020.

If Hannah changes his mind and submits the application on 1 June 2021, the most recent full financial year will be 6 April 2020 – 5 April 2021.

There are three things that you should note regarding including self-employment income towards the financial requirement:

  • You must ensure that the gross annual income from self-employment does not include any “deductible allowances, expenses or liabilities that may be applied to the gross taxable profits to establish your final tax liability”. Your accountant should know the exact figure for this based on the most recent set of accounts.
  • You must ensure that the accountant that has prepared your supporting documents is a member of:
    • a UK Recognised Supervisory Body (as defined in the Companies Act 2006); or
    • The Institute of Financial Accountants; or
    • The Association of Authorised Public Accountants; or
    • The Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy; or
    • The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants; or
    • The Association of International Accountants; or
    • The Association of Accounting Technicians.
  • Your accountant must provide you with an accountant’s certificate of confirmation that must be included in your application.
  • The self-employment income must still be a source of income at time of application.

Category GEmployment and dividend income from a specified limited company

This is the income that you can include towards the financial requirement under Category G and can be calculated as follows:

#1 Add all of the gross employment and gross dividend income received in the last two full financial years (as stated by the two most recent specified limited company’s CT600 documents)

#2 Take a mean average based on these two full financial years.

The mean average is where you add up all the numbers and then divide by the number of numbers.


Self-employed income as a sole trader, in a partnership or franchise

Ask the accountant for the mean average gross taxable profits for your fiancé(e)’s share of the business during the most recent two full financial years.

In calculating this, let the accountant know not to include any deductible allowances, expenses or liabilities that may be applied to the gross taxable profits to establish the sponsor’s final tax liability.

This is the income that you can include towards the financial requirement under Category G.

step 5What income can you COMBINE to meet the financial requirement?

Some categories of income may be combined whilst some may not.

Which Category would you like to combine?
Category A
Category B
Category C
Category D
Category E
Category F
Category G

Category A

Can be combined with: Cannot be combined with:
Non-employment income sources under Category C. Salaried and non-salaried employment income under Category B.
Cash savings under Category D.
Pension income under Category E.
Self-employment income under under Category F and Category G (as long as it falls within the relevant financial year(s) for self-employment).
Income from being a director or employee of a ‘specified limited company’ under Category F and Category G (as long as it falls within the relevant financial year(s) of the specified limited company).

Example 1:

Tony wants to combine employment income from two different employers.

Tony has been employed for longer than 6 months with one employer and fewer than 6 months with his other employer.

If Tony wants to include income from both employers, both must be calculated in accordance with Category B.

This is because Category A cannot be combined with Category B.

Alternatively, if the employment from his job where he has been employed for longer than 6 months meets the financial requirement alone, he can choose to only include this income under Category A.


Category B

Can be combined with: Cannot be combined with:
Non-employment income sources under Category C. Salaried and non-salaried employment income based on 6 month’s employment under Category A.
Cash savings under Category D – to a certain extent – see combining Category B and Category D below.
Pension income under Category E.
Self-employment income (as long as it falls within the relevant financial year(s)) under Category F and Category G.
Income from being a director or employee of a ‘specified limited company’ (as long as it falls within the relevant financial year(s)) under Category F and Category G.

Combining Category B and cash savings under Category D

Employment income under Category B can be combined with cash savings under Category D (to a certain extent – as discussed below).

However, it is important to remember that there are two parts that must be met under Category B.

To remind you:

Part 1 of the Category B test – When the visa application is submitted, the current gross annual income must be higher than the financial requirement that applies (e.g. £18,600+).

Part 2 of the Category B test – In the 12 months prior to the submission of the visa application, more than the financial requirement that applies (e.g. £18,600+) must have been received in employment income.

Please note

When combining Category B with cash savings under Category D, cash savings can only affect part 1 of the test.

Cash savings cannot affect part 2 of the test under Category B.

Therefore, including cash savings can reduce the required gross annual income that is required when the application is submitted.

But you will still need to demonstrate that £18,600 or higher has been received in employment income in the 12 months prior to when the online application is submitted.


Category C

Can be combined with: Cannot be combined with:
Employment income under Category A and Category B.
Cash savings under Category D.
Pension Income under Category E.
Self-employment income (as long as it falls within the relevant financial year(s)) under Category F and Category G.
Income from being a director or employee of a ‘specified limited company’ (as long as it falls within the relevant financial years) under Category F and Category G.

Category D

Can be combined with: Cannot be combined with:
Employment income under  Category A. Self-employment income under Category F and Category G.
Employment income under ‘Category B’, but only with part 1 of the test (see the example listed in Category B of this step). Income as a director or employee of a ‘specified limited company’ under Category F and Category G.
Non-employment income sources under Category C.
Pension income under Category E

Category E

Can be combined with: Cannot be combined with:
Employment income under Category A and Category B.
Non-employment income sources under Category C.
Cash savings under Category D.
Self-employment income (as long as it falls within the relevant financial year(s)) under Category F and Category G.
Income from being a director or employee of a ‘specified limited company’ (as long as it falls within the relevant financial year(s) under Category F and Category G.

Category FSpecified limited company income

Can be combined with: Cannot be combined with:
Employment income under Category A and Category B. Cash savings under Category D.
Non-employment income sources (e.g. property rental income, maintenance payments, click here to see the full list) under Category C. Income from self-employment as a sole trader, as a partnership or as a franchise under Category F or Category G.
Pension income under Category E.

Self-employment as a sole trader, as a partner or as a franchise income

Can be combined with: Cannot be combined with:
Employment income under Category A and Category B. Cash savings under Category D.
Non-employment income sources (e.g. property rental income, maintenance payments, click here to see the full list) under Category C. Income from a specified limited company under Category F or Category G.
Pension income under Category E.

Combining Category F income with Categories A, B, C and E

If you combine Category F with other categories, the other sources of income must fall within the most recent full financial year, which in the UK is April 6 – April 5.

We elaborate on this, and provide an example of this, in part 2 of our free video series.

Furthermore, other sources of income, just like the self-employment income, must still be a source of income when you submit the online application.


step 6What financial documents do you need to submit for a UK fiancé(e) visa?

The required fiancé(e) visa financial documents is something that is completely dependant on:

i) The sources of income that you are including;

ii) What sources of income are being combined (if any); and

iii) Other certain particular circumstances (i.e. such as whether there has been maternity, paternity or sick leave in the 6 months prior to submitting the online application).

Therefore, you should absolutely ensure that you read the appropriate sources of information as they relate to the Immigration Rules.

There are three sources of information in particular that are relevant to the fiancé(e) visa financial requirement. These are Appendix FM-SEAppendix FM 1.7 and Appendix FM 1.7a.


What is Appendix FM-SE?

Appendix FM-SE is part of the Immigration Rules.

Because of this, this makes it the most important source of information that you should be familiar with.


What is Appendix FM 1.7?

Appendix FM 1.7 is a more easily understandable Home Office document that talks about the financial requirement as it applies to the majority of applications (those where a ‘permitted benefit‘ is not received).


What is Appendix FM 1.7a?

Appendix FM 1.7a is another Home Office document that discusses the financial requirement for those who receive a permitted benefit, which will mean that the adequate maintenance test will apply.

What are the main reasons for refused UK fiancé(e) visa applications due to the financial requirement?

There are four main reasons why UK fiancé(e) visa are refused because of the financial requirement:

i) One or more required documents are not submitted;

ii) One or more documents that are submitted do not comply with specific document rules;

iii) The minimum income threshold (£18,600) is not met due to the way that the Home Office calculate income

iv) Partners rely on income sources that are not permitted (i.e. benefit related income where the adequate maintenance test does not apply).

“Would it be safe to rely on the automatically generated document checklist on the online application website?”

Solely relying on the document checklist that is given to you on the online application website is something that can be unnecessarily risky.

This is because the documents that you are required to submit is not what is said on the online website, but rather what is stated in the Immigration Rules.

Unfortunately, in many cases, the document list on the online application website is not always complete.

In addition to this, it often does not tell you particular rules that apply to certain documentation.

Because of this, you absolutely need to spend the time to familiarise yourself with Appendix FM-SE and Appendix FM 1.7.

If you would like to make sure that:

i) you submit the documents that you are required to submit; and

ii) the documents that you submit meet individual rules as they apply to certain documents

… feel free to check out our DIY Application Pack Service which has received overwhelmingly positive feedback.

In fact, based on the feedback (& results) of hundreds of partners that have relied on our application pack service, we are so confident that our application pack will help you successfully process your partner visa yourself, we offer a 100% money back guarantee.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Is the fiancé visa financial requirement the biggest cause of refusals?

The fiancé visa financial requirement is certainly the biggest cause of refusals. Unfortunately, the rules relating to the financial requirement are not only strict but they are numerous!

What fiancé visa financial requirement is commonly overlooked?

One common oversight is the definition of a specified limited company. If you do not realise that your company is a ‘specified limited company’ then unfortunately you will most likely submit the wrong supporting documentation.

Why do I have to know what category my income falls under?

This is something that you must know because completely different rules apply to the different categories. The financial requirements also differ, too!

What happens if I overlook one aspect of the fiancé visa financial requirement?

Unfortunately, the most likely outcome here is a refused application. This is because the Immigration Rules state that the application ‘must’ be refused if certain requirements are not met.

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